irecyclart:

Planter plugged in gutters Here is a conceptual idea created by Thomas Dellys. Love the look it gives to traditional gutters ! ++ Thomas Dellyshttp://bit.ly/1kEJO4w

irecyclart:

Planter plugged in gutters
Here is a conceptual idea created by Thomas Dellys. Love the look it gives to traditional gutters !

++ Thomas Dellys
http://bit.ly/1kEJO4w

TWO best Tomato seed saving methods!

tinyhousedarling:

micromanor:

Hand Built Luxury Tiny House has Fireplace built into stairs and Jacuzzi Bath and Shower for sale.

Yes please!!

natureisthegreatestartist:

A little boy is dwarfed by a supersized cabbage in Matanuska Valley, Alaska, July 1959. Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie, National Geographic.

natureisthegreatestartist:

A little boy is dwarfed by a supersized cabbage in Matanuska Valley, Alaska, July 1959. Photograph by Thomas J. Abercrombie, National Geographic.

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

(via tinyhousedarling)

awildholler:

Sweet corn, grown with no pesticides or herbicides. My field is never tilled. I cover it with horse manure compost every fall, and I cover that with straw. When I weed it by hand, the weeds are left to decompose right in place as a mulch. Squash and beans grow alongside the corn, and everything is planted by hand.
It can be done. We don’t need Monsanto. We need human labor right there, side by side with the plants. We don’t need massive petroleum powered agriculture, we need people working small horticultural plots, gaining knowledge of their specific land and it’s needs. Our land needs to be enclosed by wild space, fecund and full of birds, and bats, and insects, and snakes, and turtles, and all of the other beings that make an ecosystem function.
We can make a desert of the earth in an attempt to get high yields of low quality crops so a few corporations can temporarily get great financial returns, or we can have people spend their days bringing their food into existence, getting in touch with their bio regions, and building healthy soil and ecosystems for generations to come.
It can be done.

awildholler:

Sweet corn, grown with no pesticides or herbicides. My field is never tilled. I cover it with horse manure compost every fall, and I cover that with straw. When I weed it by hand, the weeds are left to decompose right in place as a mulch. Squash and beans grow alongside the corn, and everything is planted by hand.

It can be done. We don’t need Monsanto. We need human labor right there, side by side with the plants. We don’t need massive petroleum powered agriculture, we need people working small horticultural plots, gaining knowledge of their specific land and it’s needs. Our land needs to be enclosed by wild space, fecund and full of birds, and bats, and insects, and snakes, and turtles, and all of the other beings that make an ecosystem function.

We can make a desert of the earth in an attempt to get high yields of low quality crops so a few corporations can temporarily get great financial returns, or we can have people spend their days bringing their food into existence, getting in touch with their bio regions, and building healthy soil and ecosystems for generations to come.

It can be done.

(via m0sshead)

End of July- Garden update

Today we harvested three of our cabbage heads. The fourth unfortunately had already rotted before we could get to it this weekend. The tomatoes turned like over night, so there was a plethora ready to be picked. We still have a few sprigs of broccoli coming in and still a good helping of hotpeppers. We harvested some of the wheat growing and have it hanging up to dry in my parent’s back florida/sun room until we can thresh it. 

I also managed to make time this even to freeze some green beans, broccoli, and pickle three jars of peppers. 

Bad news: Some of our bean plants have a rust fungus, which is brown spots all over the shoots, which tend to look like cankers. 

Our garden this year is a little disappointing. We have lost quite a few plants, and are not yielding nearly what we were expecting. Other aspects are doing great, while a lot are just not having it. We are not sure if this is because of the soil quality, the high rust content of my parent’s well water, over watering, the fact we have had such a weird fluctuation in temperatures this summer. Perhaps it is all factors, but this year is not our year for a large bountiful harvest. 

naturepunk:

We were wondering why the hens weren’t laying. Turns out, they were; just not where we wanted them to.

(via tinyhousedarling)

motherearthnewsmag:

Homemade Onion Powder
Make your homegrown onions last even longer and avoid processed, store-bought alternatives by following this homemade onion powder recipe.

By Linda Deming
Photo by Fotolia/Deyan Georgiev

motherearthnewsmag:

Homemade Onion Powder

Make your homegrown onions last even longer and avoid processed, store-bought alternatives by following this homemade onion powder recipe.

By Linda Deming

Photo by Fotolia/Deyan Georgiev

(via jacksontherabbit)